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in the book those democrats this is a very critical study of the obama leadership all of the sources were democrat. tell us about that decision. >> guest: some of the politics longtime technical people in the defense department or the intelligence services and so on but for the most part these are people that worked alongside the president in one capacity or another in the white house and we need federal agencies in the house of congress to see him up close. what i discovered much to my surprise is this illustration is losing by rivalries, those in tend disagreement in this administration much life the reagan and the nixon administration but much unlike the last bush administration which was very corporate in its cultural field. there wasn't a lot of fighting. the bush memoirs haven't been that some might be. this administration is very different. there is a lot of confusion and frustration. and the administrations, the culture of the administration reflects, so you have obama, someone that comes across the people that know him as a sort of movie and indecisive, sensitive, someone that ha
is something we're looking at. secondly, i am president obama's proposal is a tax credit for companies to bring manufacturing back or invest back in the united states in communities and create jobs and proposed a 20% tax credit for those types of companies. why do you cut the corporate tax rate across the board? my argument for that is i don't think right now that either my law firm was investment bank of wall street needs that. i say let's target to areas that are in economic growth. so i am sympathetic to taxiing if they can be tied to accountability for companies to actually invest in other communities and create jobs. okay, last question. >> i'm wondering about tax incentives. on the other side, wouldn't it be okay -- i guess that's not quite the right word, to tax the imports? so that it discourages imports and encourages the local benefactor? >> that's a big debate about how much protectionism we should have as a country. my view is that the competition is fair, i think americans can compete and we should not be -- we should not be discouraged competition. the question is what happens at
president obama has been indecisive unconflicted throughout much of his presidency and many victories can be credited to someone else. this is about an hour. >> host: rich, congratulations on your new, "leading from behind: the reluctant president & the advisors who decide for him." first, tell our viewers how and why he decided to write the book. >> guest: when i sat down and said it wanted to write a book without adjectives. i think there aren't a lot of anti-obama books out there. i didn't want to be either one of those books. i want to read a book to describe it as to what i thought was the most important question, the most interesting question anyway. let's look at barack obama a character. he is the guy that is very public thank you to the experience. his entire place is that the law professors like turn, the committee table in the illinois statehouse during various meetings, but he's never the guy in the front of the room deciding, making the hard calls. he is various little management experience, suddenly he's in the most managerial job in the world. president of the united states
pleasure. thank you very much. .. i think there are a lot of anti-obama folks out there and a lot of books defending the president. i wanted to write a book that described the answer of what i thought was the most important question in and the most interesting question. look at barack obama for a moment as a character. he is a complete fish out of water in a way. he is a guy who has very little executive experience. isn't higher life is that the law professors like turn at the committee table in the illinois statehouse or the u.s. senate or in various meetings but he is never the guy in front of the room deciding, making the hard calls. he has very little if any management experience and then suddenly he is in the most important managerial job in the world. he is president of the united states leader of the free world and so my question was how does he decide? how does he make decisions? how does he govern? not with the content of the positions are but what is his leadership style? when i looked around for books we looked at this question semiserious and sustained way and they really were
are some sort of discipline testing so the smart campaigns you know and the obama campaign is emblematic of this basically thinking of almost everything the campaign does this somehow formed by data but you know, you get down to the state-level campaigns and they definitely are having you know people who are voter file managers who are doing the data and targeting people who are doing the data. you get up to the presidential campaign and one of the things, after they won the nomination built what they call the data science team and increasingly that sort of function is becoming a core function of the campaign. it used to be that there were lists for fundraising or voter list and you could buy them from vendors or consultants and now, you know, basically it's a core function of a modern campaign to have people especially on the voter side just crunching and processing data. >> host: if any of us were to go into the romney campaign are the obama campaign and we were to look around the headquarters how many people -- is there a lot of young staff? what does it look like? >> guest: chicago d
at the bottom don't have the money to buy like they once did. >> host: you know when president obama says something up this type publicly, he is castigated and he he is said to be attacking people who create wealth in america. it said, when he said you didn't build it that the largest society contributed the legal structure and the bridges on the roads, he is demeaning small small-business owners in america. do you agree or disagree? >> guest: absolutely now. he is absolutely right. it could have been phrased more eloquently perhaps. he is absolutely right. gemini are saying we did all of this ourselves. we didn't do it all ourselves. we had all kinds of help and the idea that one person or two people do everything, the best example is steve jobs and apple. apple derived enormous benefits from the advanced research projects agency that really started the internet. it wasn't al gore. it really was artba. but does he ever pay tribute to that? absolutely not. all these perceptions that one or two people did everything and the president was absolutely right. i don't think he phrased it right,
the money to buy like they once did. >> host: you know, when president obama says something of this type publicly, he's castigated said to be attacking people who create wealth in america, and it's said when he said you didn't build it that the larger society contributed the legal structure, the bridges, the roads, he is said to be demeaning small business owners in america, would you agree or disagree? >> guest: no, absolutely not. he's absolutely right. it could have been phrased more elegantly, perhaps, but he's absolutely right. that's like us saying we did this ourselves. we didn't. we had all kinds of help. the idea that one person or two people do everything -- the best example is steve jobs and apple. apple derived enormous ben facilities from the advanced research project agency that really started the interpret. it was not al gore. does he pay tribute to that? absolutely not. there's this perception that one or two people did everything. the president was right of the he didn't phrase it right, but everybody has a lot of help. >> guest: we have a statistic in the book that the
that hasn't created any jobs at all. it's eliminated jobs. >> host: but they blame president obama for that. they say by the way at the end of your book, you advised one of the solutions for this is increased government spending on infrastructure and the like. it sounds again right out of the obama playbook. but that is what it said so many working-class and middle-class people that you say you're speaking for. >> guest: we think they've been diluted on this issue of the deficit. we make this point very clear. this is not the time to be worried about the federal deficit. if the federal deficit problem? it is. we don't dispute that. right now we need to spend money. i mean, the deficit tax, where would they be 1942 in the journal comes in and says i need 100,000 taxis. what they say? would give me 10,000. the airport says we need a thousand bombers. would you be 150. that is the mentality right now. winning spending, not just a short-term stimulus playing. we need a long-term investment infrastructure, not just highways and pipelines and electric lines, technology and a whole range of things
post," his most recent book is a biography of president obama, barack obama, the story. it is called following mr. meredith. bob woodward her. his 19th book, the press and politics. he will be talking in the tent this afternoon. then pulitzer prize winner daniel juergen will be joining us here on our book tv set here on the mall to talk about his newest book, the quest, energy use in america. then christopher brown will join us for our call -in segment. eminent outlaws. gay writers in america. and then finally in the history and biography tend sally smith who has written a biography of the queen of england. she will be talking about her book. and then book tv will be joining her on set, on stage for a live national call in. so stick with us all day long for our live coverage here on book tv on c-span2. however, if that is not what you are looking for and you are looking for different authors, you can go to booktv.org. there are 16 tense down here at the national book festival, and we are able to cover two of them. the other is a contemporary
in the battle against faith. in the price of politics, bob woodward recounts congress and the obama administration's attempts to restore the u.s. economy over the last 3.5 years. look for these titles in bookstores this coming week and watch for the authors in the near future on booktv and on booktv.org. .. your thoughts it was not a legitimate war. you say if 9/11 change the world, the iraq war is similar magnitude. why do you say that? >> guest: i say that because the iraq war really led to major divisions within the international community, and i'm not just talking about the u.n. i'm talking about the impact on communities and groups in the middle east and beyond the, and the sense the world has been broken into groups, and some are being targeted or profiled, who felt very strongly about it, and this is about a war on which the international community was divided. -- it was not approved, and personally believed we should have given the weapons inspectors more time to do their work in iran and come back with a report to the security council, for the council that warned saddam, if
. even president obama says people clinging to gods and their guns, right? those of us are on the conservative side of the spectrum, i'm just really -- do you really think there isn't a substantive basis to the disagreement? i think, given that for the average voter may be the are not as involved in the particulars and their influence, people influence them, et cetera. is there a kind of core to this disagreement which is not rooted in fear, but something else? >> guest: one of the reasons i wanted to do this book with you, and we started talking about who to get to do this with, i thought you were a good person to do this. is because i wanted one of the best people on the other side to sort of lay out the arguments step-by-step. and you do that in the book, and each of us has our main essay, each of us has a rebuttal to as i explained in the rebuttal i don't think the arguments were. i don't think your arguments work. you don't take my word. so if i don't think the arguments work that i need some other explanation for why smart, thoughtful person like maggie gallagher
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11